Native Village 
Youth and Education News

December 1, 2013

NEO’s Native American graduates continue to increase
News Release form Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College
Condensed by Native Village

Oklahoma: Once again, Diverse Issues in Higher Education reports the number of Native American graduates at Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College (NEO) continues to grow. Much of that growth is attributed to the College’s American Indian Center for Excellence (AICE).

Last year, NEO’s 2013 class was comprised of 31% American Indian students. Before having AICE on campus, 39% of Native American students transferred from another college or university. After the creation of AICE, that number has risen to 82%. 

“The partnership between our nine local tribes, and their leadership, and NEO A&M continue to have a positive impact on Native American student success.  I appreciate very much the hard work of our staff at AICE and the great support from our tribal chiefs,” said NEO President Dr. Jeff Hale.
 

Since AICE’s inception, these are the following events the program established: Native American Heritage month activities included:
Miss Indian NEO pageant
Welcome powwow for Kah-Ne-You-Ah Hall’s open house
“Rock the Vote” campaign
Social media webinars
American College Test (ACT) preps
Test taking and time management workshops
Second annual Miss Indian NEO pageant
Diversity training
Director presented at both national and statewide conferences on education
Hosted talking circles for faculty, staff and students

“AICE is a really great program to have on campus,” said Claudia Little Axe, AICE director. “It is the only organization to my knowledge that caters specifically to Native American students in higher education. It is an honor for our college and our organization to see this success in our students.”

Graduation rates for Native American students at NEO are 30%. That compares to 24% for the overall student population. 

“I think one of the most impressive facts overall is that graduation numbers for our Native American students at NEO increased in six out of the nine categories from 2010-11 to 2011-12,” Hale said.

 “The rankings reflect the dedication of AICE staff members’ efforts to provide a strong, culturally relevant support system for our American Indian students. In addition, with the backing of our administration, AICE provides ongoing training in culturally responsive pedagogy for faculty and assistance in serving the unique needs of our Native students to staff campus-wide. In recent years, an increased appreciation for our local tribal cultures has changed the campus climate to increase the completion rates of our Native student population,” said Rachel Lloyd, Title III project director.

 “In addition, AICE staff formed close mentoring relationships with our graduates and inspired them to earn degrees that will serve as an investment in their own lives and their tribes’ futures,” Lloyd added.

Rankings listed below:
 

Rank Race Major 2010-11 total 2011-12 total % graduated % change

5

Native American

Registered Nursing, Nursing Administration, Nursing Research and Clinical Nursing

9

11

18%

22%

6

Native American

Health Professions and Related Programs

21

28

21%

33%

7

Native American

Homeland Security, Law Enforcement, Firefighting and Related Protective Services

1

6

50%

500%

7

Native American

Psychology

5

4

21%

-20%

12

Native American

Education

10

9

24%

-10%

14

Native American

All Disciplines Combined

68

82

21%

21%

19

Native American

Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services

7

12

30%

71%

20

Native American

Business Administration, Management and Operations

4

6

23%

50%

69

Native American

Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Studies and Humanities

13

9

14%

-31%


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