Native Village
Youth and Education news
Volume 4, November 2011

U.S. And Russian Scientists Target Elusive Siberian Snowman
Read the entire article: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/
Condensed by Native Village

Siberia: Reports of large, hairy, human-like creatures have been reported across the world for centuries. They have many names among Native American tribes. Others call them Bigfoot, Sasquatch, the Abominable Snowman and the Siberian Snowman.  But none of the elusive animals have ever been captured to confirm their existence.

Recently, an international group of scientists gathered in Siberia for a conference and trek to the Kemerovo area to hunt for the snowman.  Among those attending were cryptozoologists, researchers who study the alleged existence of unknown animals.  They have much evidence to suggest the existence of an unknown species who avoids humans. Their evidence includes:
    eyewitness accounts   photographs    
films    videos    footprints    hair     fecal materials

Loren Coleman from the International Cryptozoology Museum in Maine, co-author of The Field Guide to Bigfoot and Other Mystery Primates:

"The creatures are generally five and a half to seven and a half feet tall, a lot thinner than what most people think of as a Yeti or Bigfoot.

"They're hearty-looking and have multi-colored brownish-black fur, sometimes with a lighter top to their head and patches of white on their arms, which is unique to the Siberian Snowmen. 


"They're sometimes seen at the edge of a forest just staring at people and not really considered as wild creatures, compared to some Yeti reports in Nepal where they reportedly attack yaks or sherpas."
 
              
She added that the Siberian Snowman is reportedly not as afraid of humans as are his counterparts on other continents.

 

 

Sightings of the Siberian Snowmen have increased 300% over the past 20 years. Scientists at Moscow's Darwin Museum speculate there may be a small population of these creatures.

yetismudge
Igor Burtse heads the International Center of Hominology in Moscow which investigates so-called snowmen:

"...when Homo sapiens started populating the world, it viciously exterminated its closest relative in the hominid family, Homo neanderthalensis.

"Some of the Neanderthals, however, may have survived to this day in some mountainous wooded habitats that are more or less off limits to their arch foes. No clothing on them, no tools in hands and no fire in the household. Only round-the-clock watchfulness for a Homo sapiens around."

Native American Bigfoot Names
Source: Bigfoot Indian Names

Tribe

Tribe's Name:

 Meaning

Tshimshian Indians

n/a

"Cannibal"

Yup'ik Indian

A hoo la huk

n/a

Zuni Indian

Atahsaia

"The Cannibal Demon"

Chinookan Indian

At'at'ahila

n/a

Bella Coola Indian

Boqs

"Bush Man"

Kwakwaka'wakw Indian

Bukwas

"Wildman of the Woods"

Dakota (East)/Sioux Indian

Chiha tanka

"Big Elder Brother"

Lakota (West)/Sioux Indian

Chiye tanka

"Big Elder Brother"

Wenatchee Indian

Choanito

"Night People"

Makah Indians

El-Ish-kas

"n/a"

Seminole Indian

Esti Capcaki

"Tall Man"

Iroquois/Seneca Indian

Ge no sqwa

"Stone Giants"

Seneca Indian

Ge no'sgwa

"Stone Coats"

Lake Lliamna Indian

Get'qun

n/a

Nelchina Plateau Indian

Gilyuk

"Big Man with little hat"

Haida Indians

Gogit

"n/a"

Chilkat Indian

Goo tee khl

n/a

Quinault Indians

Hecaitomixw

"Dangerous Being"

Plains Indians

Iktomi

"The Trickster "

Skagit Valley Indian

Kala'litabiqw

n/a

Cherokee Indian

Kecleh-Kudleh

"Hairy Savage"

Tlingit Indian

Kushtaka

"Otter Man"

Hare Indian

lariyin

"Bushman"

Miwuk Indian

Loo poo oi'yes

n/a

Karok Indian

Madukarahat

"Giant"

Menomini Indian

Manabai'wok

"The Giants"

Nootka Indian

Matlose

n/a

Lenni Lenape Indian

Mesingw

"The Mask Being"

Kawaiisu Indian

Miitiipi

"Bad luck or disaster"

Lenni Lenape Indian

Misinghalikun

"Living Solid Face"

Gwich'in Indians

Na'in

"Brushman"

Kenai Peninsula Indian

Nantiinaq

n/a

Dena'ina Indian

Nant'ina

n/a

Alutiiq/Yukon Indian

Neginla eh

"Wood Man"

Oglala Lakota Sioux Indian

n/a

"The Big Man"

Twana Indians

n/a

"Stick Indians"

Coeur d'Alene/Spokane Indian

n/a

"The Tree Men"

Cherokee Indian

Nun Yunu Wi

"The Stone Man"

Owens Valley Paiute

Nu'numic

"The Giant"

Hoopa Indian

Oh Mah

"Boss of the Woods"

Yurok Indian

Omah

n/a

Iroquois Indian

Ot ne yar heh

"Stonish Giant"

Yakama/Klickitat Indian

Qah lin me

n/a

Yakama/Klickitat Indian

Qui yihahs

"The Five Brothers"

Turtle Mt Ojibway

Rugaru

n/a

Halkomelem Language

Sasahevas

"Sasquatch"

Salish Indian

"Wild Man of the Woods"

Salishan/Sahaptin Indian

Saskets

"The Giant"

Spokane Indian

Sc'wen'ey'ti

"Tall Burnt Hair""

Yakama Indian

Seat ka

n/a

Yakama/Klickitat/Puyallup

Seatco

"Stick Indian"

Clallam Indian

Seeahtkch

n/a

Coast Salish Indian

See'atco

"One who runs and hides"

Colville Indians

Skanicum

"Stick Indians"

Chinook Indian

Skookum

"Evil God of the Woods"

Quinault Indians

Skukum

"Devil of the Forest"

Upper Stalo Indians

Slalakums

"The Unknown"

Okanogan Indian

Sne nah

"Owl Woman"

Hopi Indian

So'yoko

n/a

Yakama Indian

Ste ye mah

"Spirit hidden by woods"

Puyallup/Nisqually Indian

Steta'l

"Spirt Spear"

Yakama/Shasta Indian

Tah tah kle' ah

"Owl Woman Monster"

Taos Indian

Toylona

"Big Person"

Quinault Indians

Tsadjatko

"Giants"

Mono Lake Paiute

Tse'nahaha

"Giant"

Puyallup/Nisqually Indian

Tsiatko

"Wild Indians"

Shoshone Indian

Tso apittse

"Cannibal Giant"

Kwakwaka'wakw Indian

Tsonaqua

"Wild Woman of the Woods"

SW Alaskan Eskimo

Urayuli

n/a

Cree Indian

Wetiko

n/a

Eastern Athabascan Indian

Windago

"Wicked Cannibal"

Lenni Lenape Indian

Wsinkhoalican

"The Game Keeper"

Nehalem/Tillamook Indian

Xi'lgo

"Wild Woman"

Modoc Indian

Yahyahaas

n/a

Klamath Indian

Yayaya-ash

"The Frightener"

Navajo Indians

Yť'iitsoh

"Big God "

Nehalem/Tillamook Indian

Yi' dyi'tay

"Wild Man"

 

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