Native Village
Youth and Education news
Volume 3, November 2011

Traditional Foods Go Digital
Read the entire article: http://uuathluk.ca/wordpress/?p=826
Condensed by Native Village

 
Hear a CBC Radio interview with NTC Vice President, Priscilla Sabbas-Watts, and youth council member, Damon Rampanen, about the toolkit.

A new resource about harvesting and preparing traditional foods shares the experiences, language, and knowledge of Nuu-chah-nulth elders. The Nuu-chah-nulth Traditional Foods Toolkit teaches that food security begins at home.

Developed by Uu-a-thluk, [Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council fisheries department], the booklets teach how to harvest, prepare and eat traditional foods found on Vancouver Island. These foods include sockeye salmon, herring spawn, goose barnacles, sea urchins, chitons, wild roots, and eelgrass.

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A school of sockeye salmon, swimming up the Adams River to spawn, where they will lay eggs and die. Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada, Oncorhynchus nerka, natural history stock photograph, photo id 26146A school of sockeye salmon, swimming up the Adams River to spawn, where they will lay eggs and die. Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada, Oncorhynchus nerka, natural history stock photograph, photo id 26146

sockeye salmon


herring spawn

goose barnacles

sea urchins

chitons

wild roots

eelgrass

 

“Our ancestors have harvested wild foods for over 10,000 years, and a number of our people still harvest wild food today,” says Priscilla Sabbas Watts from the Nuu-chah-Nulth Tribal Council. “This knowledge is more important than ever in the face of global food instability. Sharing this wisdom will make it more accessible to future generations.”

Vancouver Island residents live in one of the richest natural paradises on the planet, yet 90 % of their food comes from elsewhere. The Nuu-chah-nulth Traditional Foods Toolkit recalls a time when people ate foods  found in their natural habitat, and not on supermarket shelves.

“The toolkit offers a tremendous opportunity to pass on traditional knowledge, which teaches self reliance, nutrition, pride for one’s heritage, and sustainability—all important to developing food sovereignty,” adds Sabbas Watts.

Proceeds from all sales go towards education and training programs for youth and others in Nuu-chah-nulth Nations.

 

 

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