Native Village 

Youth and Education News

May 4, 2005 Issue 151 Volume 4

"As a Native American youth you need to be successful in both worlds. That means you need to be successful in keeping our culture alive and you also need to be successful in the Western way of living. That means going to college and coming back to help." Tasha Norton, Hupa, Yurok and Karuk


Cloutier says award is for Inuit everywhere
IQALUIT – The United Nations Environment Programme has named Sheila Watt-Cloutier one of seven "Champions of the Earth."   Watt-Cloutier, the chair of the Inuit Circumpolar Conference, was given the award for setting the world's environmental agenda and laying the foundation for progress.  Watt-Cloutier accepted the award for Inuit everywhere. She said the "Champions of the Earth" award reflects the Arctic as the world's climate change barometer and the Inuit as the mercury in that barometer.
CBC News

Rosebud Sioux Tribe saddened horses sent to slaughter
South Dakota: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe of South Dakota is saddened that some of the horses it bought from the Bureau of Land Management were sent to slaughter. The tribe bought 141 wild mustangs from the Bureau of Land Management in one of the first transactions of the agency's new wild horse program. But in trading 87 aging horses for younger ones, 35 animals ended up being slaughtered. ''I don't think it's fair to say [the Sioux) violated the agreement,'' said BLM director. Kathleen Clarke. ''They were not traded to the animal processing facility. They were trading to a private individual.'' In its contract with BLM, the tribe asked for young horses so they could be used for Sinte Gleska University's Ranch Program. The program selects a horse for each  youth who trains, rides and cares for the animal. The BLM has launched an investigation to determine if the contract was violated.
american_indians_news_source_tulanappes_list@yahoogroups.com
artwork: © Dreamworks

New Slide May Help Salmon Cross Dams
Washington: A removable spillway weir has been created  to help in the recovery of Pacific salmon. The steel device, which weighs 1,700,000 pounds, creates a slick waterside for endangered salmon. Government scientists and officials say the weir technology holds great hope for easing more fish safely through dams. The weir essentially creates a hole in the dam. The fish do not have to dive over the dam because the hole and the water flow are at about the same water level as the fish.  But getting fish to find the water hole is another challenge.  Many critics say that only blowing up the dams can save the salmon which are central to the lives and cultures of Northwest Indian tribes. "We see this as just more gold-plating to buy time to allow them to continue on with their operations," said Olney Patt, Jr., of the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission. "Somebody is benefiting, and it isn't the fish." The weirs are part of a $6,000,000,000 salmon recovery plan by the federal government that includes installing weirs or similar technology at all eight dams on the Snake and the Columbia Rivers. The plan has touched off bitter opposition from environmentalists, Indians, sports fishermen, and former Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt, who is one of the nation's loudest proponents of dam removal on the Lower Snake.
New York Times

    Woolly Mammoth Resurrection, "Jurassic Park" Planned
A team of Japanese genetic scientists aims to bring woolly mammoths back to life and create a Jurassic Park-style refuge for resurrected species. Their plan: to retrieve sperm from a mammoth frozen in tundra, use it to impregnate an elephant, and then raise the offspring in the Siberian wild. "If we create a mammoth, we will know much more about these animals, their history, and why they went extinct," said Kazufumi Goto from the Mammoth Creation Project. Many mammoth experts, however, scoff at the idea, calling it  impossible and irresponsible. "DNA preserved in ancient tissues is fragmented into thousands of tiny pieces nowhere near sufficiently preserved to drive the development of a baby mammoth," said Adrian Lister from University College in England. "[Furthermore], the natural habitat of the mammoth no longer exists. We would be creating an animal as a theme park attraction. Is this ethical?"   Woolly mammoths stood about 11 feet (3.4 meters) tall at the shoulder and weighed about seven tons. Scientists believe woolly mammoths became extinct 10,000 years ago as warming weather diminished their food sources.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2005/04/0408_050408_woollymammoth.html

The Story of the Pequot War has been selected for national PBS distribution
The Story of the Pequot War has been selected for national PBS distribution through American Public Television Exchange Service. Mystic Voices features the voice of Academy Award nominee Roy Scheider, and music by the Grammy nominated Joanne Shenandoah. The two-hour documentary has been nominated for four Emmys.  Currently, 46 of the 145 local PBS stations plan to broadcast Mystic Voices. 18 are still considering.
Ask PBS to air Mystic Voices broadcast in your area: www.pbs.org
The Story of the Pequot War: www.PequotWar.com

Lori's dream
Arizona: The ABC television program, "Extreme Makeover: Home Edition," has built a 4,300-square-foot home for the family of Lori Piestewa. Lori, a Hopi Indian, was killed in Iraq in  April 2003 and is the first Native American woman to die in combat  Jessica Lynch, the former Iraq prisoner of war and Lori's best friend, had nominated the family for the program.  Through a joint effort by  Lynch, Shea Homes of Phoenix, the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, the National Congress of American Indians and Extreme Makeover, the Piestewa family's new home includes six bedrooms, a three-car garage, patio, playground, and a solar panel on the roof. It's located on  a six-acre plot near the San Francisco Peaks north of Flagstaff.  Extreme Makeover will air the Piestewa's segment as the season's 2-hour finale on May 22
http://www.navajotimes.com/news_p/lori.php

First Americans in the Arts Awards
California: The First Americans in the Arts 13 Annual Ceremony honored the best of Indian Country in the television and movie industry. Among the award winners:
WES STUDI, LEAD ACTOR in the PBS television movie THE THIEF OF TIME.
RUSSELL MEANS, BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR in the feature film BLACK CLOUD.
CHRIS EYRE, BEST DIRECTOR of the television movie THE THIEF OF TIME.
GRAHAM GREENE, BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR for THE THIEF OF TIME.
KARINA LOMBARD, BEST RECURRING ROLE as Marina on the television series THE L WORD.
STEVE REEVIS, GUEST ROLE for his performance on the ABC television series LINE OF FIRE.
JULIA JONES, BEST LEAD ACTRESS in the feature film BLACK CLOUD.
ALEX RICE, BEST SUPPORTING ROLE in the PBS television movie THE THIEF OF TIME.
KELLY BYARS, BEST NEW PERFORMANCE in the television movie THE THIEF OF TIME.
ARIGON STARR, BEST LEAD ACTRESS in the play PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH THE INDIANS.
ANDREW ROA, BEST LEAD ACTOR in the play PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH THE INDIANS.
JIMMY LEE YOUNG, BEST MUSCIAL ACHIEVEMENT for his new album MAYA.
http://www.firstamericans.org/13thpr.htm

A Spat Over a Spit
Dominican Republic: The sequel to the Disney movie Pirates of the Caribbean has Johnny Depp roasting over a fire "like a shish kebab," said Bruce Hendricks, from Walt Disney Pictures. "It's a funny, almost campy sequence." To those Dominicans who see the economic benefits of the film being shot in the Dominican Republic, the scene is a frivolous fantasy. But some of Dominica's Carib inhabitants are offended by the insinuation that their forebears were cannibals. "Pirates did come to the Caribbean in the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries," said Chief Charles Williams who denied the Caribs eve ate their victims. The indigenous people, the chief argues, were simply defending themselves.  "Our ancestors were labeled cannibals....Today, that myth, that stigma is still alive... Disney wants to popularize that stigma one more time, this time through film, and film is a powerful tool of propaganda."
Los Angeles Times

Olympic emblem not a winner with First Nations
British Columbia: Controversy is growing among some Aboriginal leaders over the logo for the 2010 Winter Olympic Games in Vancouver. The emblem – a five-piece Inukshuk logo, called "Ilanaaq"  – has the support of Nunavut Premier Paul Okalik and InuitTapiriit Kanatami  president  Jose Kusugak. But Peter Irniq, a former Nunavut commissioner, says it is wrong to call the symbol an inukshuk, which is a highly important Inuit marker. He said the symbol resembles an inunguat, which is an imitation of a human, and officials should have first consulted elders.  Other Aboriginal leaders upset by the logo include Grand Chief Edward John of the First Nations Summit, who says the logo should better represent the Northwest tribes. "First Nations in British Columbia helped sway the Olympic selection committee," said John. "One of the first important acts the [Vancouver 2010] committee did was kind of a slight on the support of First Nations." Chief Stewart Philip, president of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs, was also outspoken in his criticism. "I can't help but notice the remarkable resemblance it has to Pac-Man," he said. Pac-Man is a video game character from the 1980s.
http://vancouver.cbc.ca/regional/servlet/View?filename=bc_inukshuk20050426

UI sends lengthy report to NCAA
The NCAA will spend the next few months reviewing information about how American Indian symbols are used by the University of Illinois and other schools. The UI this week sent a self-evaluation of its use of Chief Illiniwek to the NCAA. The issue of UI's American Indian college mascot raises concerns over possible NCAA violations against cultural diversity, sportsmanship and ethical conduct and nondiscrimination. Most likely, the NCAA won't respond until after August, when its executive committee meets to review the issue.   
http://www.news-gazette.com/localnews/story.cfm?Number=18142

Navajo coach looking to field national Native team
Diney Bnally hopes to field a competitive team for the USA Jr. Olympic Baseball Tournament. Bnally will be in his fourth year coaching this unique team -- the only All-Native American team competing in this national event.   “The Indian kids need good exposure and opportunities and I wanted to give back,” said Bnally, who grew up playing baseball and later coached at the National Military Institute in Roswell, New Mexico.  Bnally hopes to field a team of 15 players to fully show their skills in front of many college recruiters and scouts.  “There are so many good baseball players out there that sometimes just don’t get the chance to show it!” he said.
For more information about try-outs, or team sponsorship, Bnally can be contacted at 1-877-203-9852.
http://nativetimes.com/

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